Married dating site scams

Nancy*, a 47-year-old single mother from North Yorkshire was conned out of over £350,000 that way: “I wasn't comfortable, and then I got so far in I couldn't get myself out, and I didn't want to walk away having lost £50,000 or what-have-you, so you keep going in the hope that you're wrong and this person is genuine,” she explained to the BBC.Nancy is now facing bankruptcy, and although her case is extreme, the average victim of online dating fraud loses £10,000 according to Action Fraud.Upon finding victims, scammers lure them to more private means of communication, (such as providing an e-mail address) to allow for fraud to occur.The fraud typically involves the scammer acting as if they've quickly fallen for the victim so that when they have the opportunity to ask for money, the victim at that time has become too emotionally involved, and will have deep feelings of guilt if they decline the request for money from the scammer.“A lot of the online dating fraudsters we know are abroad.

Con artists are increasingly creating fake online profiles and tricking people on dating sites into handing over often large sums of money.Also, the creators of fake affair dating sites know that their viewers have reached a certain part of their lives when they are likely to become desperate for a little “something else” or for “some action”.Infidelity does come for a price usually, but the or to make a hoax out of everything, leaving you without a partner.One of the most common techniques is to build up trust with the person by messaging for weeks or even months before suddenly having an emergency - the fake person being mugged but their daughter needing urgent surgery, for example - and asking for money.But then they suddenly need money for rent too, then food, then medical fees, and it can quickly escalate.Letters are exchanged between the scammer and victim until the scammer feels they have groomed the victim enough to ask for money.

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